Tarbat Ness Lighthouse 1830

This lighthouse stands directly across the Moray Firth from Covesea (which you have seen here many times) This was recce trip before I return for classic shot during the Spring - watch this space. The loss of sixteen vessels in the Moray Firth storm in November 1826 brought many applications for lights on Tarbat Ness or Covesea Skerries, and the former was given priority as it had been named in 1814, and was regarded by the Caledonian Canal Commissioners as important to that undertaking. Tarbat Ness Lighthouse was engineered by Robert Stevenson and the light was first exhibited on 26 January 1830. James Smith of Inverness was the contractor responsible for the building of the lighthouse. The lighthouse tower is the third tallest in Scotland (North Ronaldsay and Skerryvore being taller) and bears two distinguishing broad red bands. (Northern Lighthouse Board)
This lighthouse stands directly across the Moray Firth from Covesea Skerries (which you have seen on this blog many times) This was taken on a recce trip before I return for the classic shot during the Spring – watch this space. The loss of sixteen vessels in the Moray Firth storm in November 1826 brought many applications for lights on Tarbat Ness or Covesea Skerries, and the former was given priority as it had been named in 1814, and was regarded by the Caledonian Canal Commissioners as important to that undertaking.
Tarbat Ness Lighthouse was engineered by Robert Stevenson and the light was first exhibited on 26 January 1830. James Smith of Inverness was the contractor responsible for the building of the lighthouse. The lighthouse tower is the third tallest in Scotland (North Ronaldsay and Skerryvore being taller) and bears two distinguishing broad red bands. (Northern Lighthouse Board)
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21 thoughts on “Tarbat Ness Lighthouse 1830

    1. yes it was – but to be honest I struggled to capture it, the sky and foreground were manageable but the light on the lighthouse itself – due to it’s colour – overexposed so I had to dodge the lighthouse itself

    1. Cheers Gunta – I am working hard on thinking about what I want in advance and going out to get it. Initially I was more of a reactive photographer – but that is changing

      1. Never have been much of a planner. I consider myself opportunistic. Just don’t get so determined that you miss some great ones along the way….. 😉

  1. I so agree with the previous commenters, this is a very nice, clean composition.
    If I am not mistaken this is the lighthouse which is deemed sufficient now to keep travel in these waters safe, rendering the Covesea lighthouse redundant and leading to its decommissioning.

    1. Technically you are right this lighthouse got the decision over Covesea but the Skerries still have a small modern digital light on the skerries pergorming the same task in a more modern manner. I think this lighthouse will photograph well in the spring surrounded by yellow horse

    1. Dawn thanks – I am rapidly becoming infatuated with lighthouses – probably due to the ability to hang the landscape and light around them – a fellow blogger Murray Foote (Australian) has photographed all the Australian Lighthouses and published abook. I have ambitions to do similar here in Scotland.

  2. A particularly good composition with that curving line leading to the lighthouse. I haven’t come to expect sunny day photos from you.

    1. Lyle kind words however I am sure that I have generated more sunny pictures than you imply 😉 I think probably you are referring to my ‘blue period’ where I have dwelled on low light images – ha ha

  3. There’s something about lighthouses that has a bit sad hinge for me. In a nice way, of course. A beautful composition of nature and masterfully noticed&captured by you, Scott.

    1. I find it sad that most if not all are automated – but of all man’s encroachment with nature I find lighthouses the least intrusive ( which of course is factually wrong as they can be seen for miles ) – perhaps it is that I romanticise them or that they are usually located in beautiful wild places – I don’t know

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