A Whispering Wind

This is a dark and foreboding Rothes Wind Farm near Glenlatterach. A fabulously  dark sky coupled with a slow shutter speed to display the movement of you love it or hate it wind farm. Renewable must be Scotland's future. BT has agreed a Β£300m deal to buy enough energy to meet the needs of all its Scottish operations for the next 20 years from a wind farm in the Borders. I dont want to be held to ransom by foreign energy markets
This is a dark and foreboding Rothes Wind Farm near Glenlatterach. A fabulously dark sky coupled with a slow shutter speed to display the movement of you love it or hate it wind farm. Renewable must be Scotland’s future. BT has agreed a Β£300m deal to buy enough energy to meet the needs of all its Scottish operations for the next 20 years from a wind farm in the Borders. Hopefully this will be a trend with more investment in wave power too. I for one don’t want to be held to ransom by foreign energy markets. Anyway enough politics – enjoyΒ 
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22 thoughts on “A Whispering Wind

  1. Couldn’t agree more, Scott. We are going solar this year. Who wants to be held to ransom by anyone when nature can provide cleaner, cheaper energy.!?
    Yes, your photo is dark; but that’s real, and illustrates yet another aspect of this incredible planet.

  2. Captured the subject well…..as to the topic, well I am still in a love hate relationship with turbines. Some places they seem to fit and the scale of the environment ‘shrinks’ them….other locations and the turbines just dominate and destroy.

  3. Lovely tonality in this, Scott.

    I’ll be up your way from Saturday. Will be spending time at Duncansby Head and hope to visit Bow Fiddle Rock too. If we exchange mobile numbers I can get in touch and hopefully we can meet up when I visit Bow Fiddle Rock. My email is simonhowlett5@btinternet.com

  4. But will you feel the same when every hillside you want to photograph is covered with turbines? Foreboding is perhaps a good word to use. … but enough politics as you say !

    1. Some people quite like them some loath them (wind turbines). I have mixed feelings as long as the planning permission process is rigorous I am less concerned. I don’t believe if we pursue a mixed renewable energy policy (and invest in wave power also) not forgetting “Hydro” which was equally reviled when it came in. Glen Affric which was born from hydro power is now acclaimed as one of the most scenic areas of Scotland. So the foreboding was a reference to the sky and I was trying to show beauty in the movement of the turbines. One thing is for certain I would not wish to be beholden to Russian energy at exorbitant prices. I don’t believe there is a solution which will appease all camps but I believe the current renewable’s policy is progressive, positive and ahead of most western powers. I hope you take the time to look across the wider body of my portfolio I will certainly reciprocate.

  5. Another great shot Scott. I hear they are taking a lot of turbines off the land and instead building them off shore.

  6. Love the wind farms, but the shot is a bit too dark and forboding for my taste. But that’s entirely subjective as they say. πŸ™‚

  7. The low shutter speed makes picture dynamic. The composition with the dark cloudy sky is dramatic. North of Europe is covered with the wind turbines. One month ago on my way from Germany to Canada via London I saw a lot of them in the water of North Sea beside England coast. Sorry for the comparison, but from the above it looks like Arlington cemetery in Washington DC.

  8. You certainly got me with this one, I love wind farms and I’m right with you on the renewables front. Scotland apparently has 25% of Europe’s offshore wind resources, as well as 25% of its tidal potential, that’s a lot of energy from the sea and I hope we can make the most of it. As for the photo – wonderful! πŸ™‚

    1. Thanks Lorna – looking at it again its probably too dark but I don’t like adding to the exposure it washes the rest of the picture out – I have decided to say no more on wind farms.

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